Spice of Life - Cinnamon

Cinnamon has a long history both as a spice and as a medicine. It is the brown bark of the cinnamon tree, which is available in its dried tubular form known as a quill or as ground powder. The two varieties of cinnamon, Chinese and Ceylon, have similar flavor, however the cinnamon from Ceylon is slightly sweeter, more refined and more difficult to find in local markets.

History:

It is said that one of the spices that inspired Columbus to go looking for India was Cinnamon. Cinnamon is one of the oldest spices known. It was mentioned in the Bible and was used in ancient Egypt not only as a beverage flavoring and medicine, but also as an embalming agent.Cinnamon was used historically in China, and is mentioned in one of the earliest books on Chinese botanical medicine, dated around 2,700 B.C.

Uses:

Cinnamon in modern day is used for both cooking and in medicine.

Health Benefits:

  • In some studies, cinnamon has shown an amazing ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections.
  • Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices.
  • In a study published by researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Maryland, cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.
  • In a study at Copenhagen University, patients given half a teaspoon of cinnamon powder combined with one tablespoon of honey every morning before breakfast had significant relief in arthritis pain after one week and could walk without pain within one month.

Recipes:

Here are a few recipes that use Cinnamon:


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